Butterfly Conservation

Conservation

A Conversation about Conservation!

Currently, we are living through the Holocene Extinction period ­– the biggest mass extinction event since we lost the dinosaurs 66 million years ago! Whilst we’re not 100 per cent sure what wiped out the dinosaurs and three quarters of the Earth’s animal and plant life all those years ago, we are sure about the number one cause of the Holocene Extinction Event – it’s humans.

A mix of our activities has indiscriminately, directly and indirectly, caused the extinction of over 800 known species since 1500CE. We have only catalogued 1.2 million species and modern estimates predict that 8.7 million might exist, we cannot be sure about just how many we are losing, but it may be as many 150 a day.

Therefore, active help is required. Hanwell Zoo contributes in three ways: Conservation, Education and Community.

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Conservation

Hanwell Zoo holds a number of animals whose numbers in the wild are declining. Bali starling, red-crowned crane, phantasmal poison arrow frog, Azara’s agouti and the hazel dormouse, to name but a few. International efforts are in place to ensure these species are well looked after in captivity, and their numbers kept at sustainable levels. In recent years, Hanwell Zoo has seen particular success with the Mindanao bleeding-heart dove, whose numbers may be as low as 1,500 in the wild. Our young birds go on to live in other reputable and accredited collections across the country to form their own breeding pairs with unrelated birds, in hope, that one day, large numbers will be able to be released in the wild of their native Philippines.

Education

From thousands of local school children participating in our education programmes every year, to even more visitors enjoying our onsite resources, we pride ourselves on bringing the conservation message to you all. By informing ourselves on the plight of the natural world, we feel more engaged and perhaps more inclined to help.

Community

Community is the essence of our being. Without the support and involvement of the wider community, we would not be able to deliver the services we do. From volunteering, support and participating with events, our community directly sustain our conservation work. To see how you could get involved, click here